Conor Harrington (born 1980[3]) is an Irish-born street/graffiti artist based in London, England.[1]
Source: Wikipedia

I am part of a family that values and experiences creativity in our daily lives. Creativity manifests in a variety of ways – in business, fashion, interior design, and of course the more traditional arts such as painting, writing, dance, music, and theater.
We are art producers and collectors.
Our tastes vary as a family; however, we agree on the importance of art in its many genres and forms. Art is unfolding, it stokes the imagination and compels us to extend our understanding of life outside of our personal world.

I recently came across the work of Connor Harrington, an Irish street/graffiti artist based in London (http://www.conorharrington.com/about/). Harrington’s work can be found in the most unusual places – the side of an abandoned building in the far reaches of Norway or in the center of London. Harrington’s work represents that thrills me about art, to watch others use their art to tell their story, the stories of others who may not have a voice, and represent experiences that have value to all of us. Below is a picture of Harrington in his studio.

Harrington, Connor

My interest in art inspired by a love of art, not to boast about a piece or a collection, rather to share some of the work I admire and what it provokes in me, and perhaps you might feel the same or wish to learn more about a particular artist.

Let me tell you a true story which recently occurred.

There Are No Accidents
During a recent trip to the Napa Valley in California to enjoy the region’s famous wine and cuisine, I stumbled upon an artist quite accidentally. The afternoon was filled with anticipation as we were on our way to lunch at Bouchon, a 1 Michelin Star French style Brasserie serving traditional plates. Bouchon is known for its roast chicken among other fantastic dishes. I enjoyed a cooled 2002 Bollinger RD while awaiting shell fish starters.
Harrington Conor Dinner
I had the roast chicken for lunch and it did not disappoint! While savoring the dish complimented by champagne, I noticed an upbeat and well dressed gentlemen sitting next to me. It was hard not to stare at his long white beard joined by a mustache wrapped around his gentle face. We exchanged a few afternoon cheers, though only I had a glass in hand (giggle). It took me a few minutes to realize I was sitting next to Mr Scarecrow himself, of Scarecrow Wine, which we happened to taste the night before at Restaurant Benu in SanFrancisco. What a thrill and coincidence to find myself chatting with the maker himself! And that’s not all. Mr. Scarcrow wine, AKA Brett Lopez, invited my husband and I to his home the next day, an offer we could not turn down!

Lopez’s home is located in Rutherford on a beautiful estate/vineyard his grandfather once owned, and he purchased back into the family in 2002 (a fascinating story in itself). We tasted his famous “cult cab”, a term used to describe these great Napa wines. Mr. Lopez also showed us his artwork, which was actually the most delightful discovery of our chance meeting. Bret Lopez creates beautiful bold work taken with a camera 27-33mm lens I happen to spot on his desk. Lopez was a successful commercial photographer until 1998, when he decided to return to his roots and make wine and art. Lopez’s story was a lesson in art and wine, and perhaps most important, in life and the beauty that is created when people are true to themselves. It was a magical experience to have “bumped” into Lopez during lunch, but once again I was reminded there are no accidents, only what is meant to be.

To learn more about Scarecrow Wines and the story of a family legacy http://www.scarecrowwine.com/owner
To view Lopez’s art visit his website at http://bretlopez.com.

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